Women make-up artists in bollywood and gender bias

Adyasree Prakriti Sivakumar

Supreme Court says no discrimination on ground of gender.

India’s $2-billion film industry is the largest in world by ticket sales. It produces between 300 to 325 movies a year and, although there are no official figures, trade analysts say the Hindi-language industry alone employs more than 250,000 people, most of them contract workers.

In a landmark judgment by the Supreme Court of India, now says that make-up artists cannot be discriminated on the grounds of gender, domicile or years of experience to join any professional institute thus, declaring it “unlawful”.  The apex court also quashed provision which puts restriction on women make-up artists and hair dressers from becoming the members of professional associations. This nearly six decade practice was forcefully stopped due to its “unlawfulness” and “being unconstitutional” and was told not be followed for even a day longer!

The apex court bench headed by Justice Dipak Misra also struck down the provision of the make-up artists and hairdressers association that mandated a person to be a resident of a particular place for five years to entitle him/her to become member of the association.

In a court case brought by a group of female make-up artists against the Cine Costume Make-up Artists and Hair Dressers Association (CCMAA), a two-judge bench said on Monday it would not permit this type of discrimination.

To quote Justices Dipak Misra and U U Lalit, “You better delete this clause on your own. Remove this immediately. We are in 2014, not in 1935. Such things cannot continue even for a day,” they told the CCMAA. The petition was brought by make-up artist Charu Khurana and other qualified female artists whose applications for make-up artist identification cards were rejected by the CCMAA because they are women.

As quoted rightly by Justices Dipak Mishra and U U Lalit, we are living in an era of modernization and internationalization, then why do such cases or circumstances still come up? Why is it that, when we are “getting inspired” by other nations in aspects of technology and computerization, we lack in getting inspired in these aspects?

Why is it that the petition filed, firstly by Charu Khuranna and her team, was rejected on the grounds that she is a “woman”? Doesn’t Article 15 of our Constitution say a big NO to this? To add on, in the very same article, clause (3) says, “….Nothing in this article shall prevent the State from making any special provision for women and children”. Why is it that despite such protection and clarity such a situation arose?

It’s high time we analyzed on this side of the coin. To put it in a nutshell it is “the need of the hour”. In our thoughts and actions alone lie the answers to the problem.

The Sexual Harassment of Women at Workplace (Prevention, Prohibition and Redressal) Act, 2013 – An Analysis

Vishnu S Warrier

Sexual harassment is an act that creates a hostile working environment which may be by way of cracking lewd jokes, verbal or physical abuse, circulating lewd rumors etc. Though, India had signed and ratified Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) way back in 1993, we did not have a specific legislation to address the issue of sexual harassment at Workplace. Till 1997, facing victim of sexual harassment at the workplace had to lodge a complaint under Section 354 ((Criminal assault of women to outrage women’s modesty))and 509 ((Assault or criminal force to woman with intent to outrage her modesty))of the Indian Penal Code 1860. However, scenario changed when Supreme Court stipulated the famous Vishaka Guidelines though its landmark judgment in Vishaka and others v State of Rajasthan ((Word, gesture or act intended to insult the modesty of a woman)).

Further, Court observed that, the consideration of “CEDAW and norms are significant for the purpose of interpretation of the guarantee of gender equality, right to work with human dignity in Articles 14, 15, 19(1) (g) and 21 of the Constitution and the safeguards against sexual harassment implicit therein.” Vishaka guidelines defined sexual harassment and codified preventive measures and redressal mechanisms to be undertaken by employers. Accordingly, Government of India passed the Sexual Harrassment of Women at Workplace (Prevention, prohibition & Redressal) Act ((Hereinafter the Act)), to provide protection against sexual harassment of women at workplace and for the prevention and redressal of complaints of sexual harassment and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto, and the same has been made effective on December 9, 2013 ((Gazette Notification dated December 9, 2013)).

The Act will ensure that women are protected against sexual harassment at all the Workplaces, be it in public or private. This will contribute to realisation of their right to gender equality, life and liberty and equality in working conditions. The sense of security at the workplace will improve women’s participation in work, resulting in their economic empowerment and inclusive growth ((Press Information Bureau, Government of India (Dated November 4, 2010). Protection of Women against Sexual Harassment at Workplace Bill, 2010, last accessed on December 12, 2013.)).

Key Features of the Act

Sexual harassment at Workplace

The Act defines sexual harassment to include unwelcome sexually determined behaviour such as physical contact, request for sexual favours, sexually coloured remarks, screening of pornography, or any other conduct of sexual nature ((Section 2 (n).)). It may further include any promise of preferential treatment, threat of detrimental treatment, hostile work environment, or humiliating conduct constituting health and safety problems ((Section 3 (2).)).

Workplace, Employer, Employee

Workplace is defined to include all organizations, and any other places visited by an employee during the course of work ((Section 2 (o).))and it covers every woman at the work place whether employed or not ((Section 2 (f).)). Further, the Act defines employer as the person responsible for the management, supervision and control of the work place ((Section 2 (g).)).

Internal Complaints Committee & Other Local Committees

The Act insists upon the formation of an Internal Complaints Committee in every workplace, as per the provisions of Section 4. It further provides that, where the offices or administrative units of the workplace are located in various places, Internal Complaints Committee shall be constituted in all such units.

The Act also empowers the District Officer to constitute Local Compliant Committees in every district. And such Local Committee shall include an eminent woman who is working in the area of Social Work and committed towards the cause of women, as the Chairperson, and two members from an NGO committed to the cause of women ((Section 7)).

Duties of Employer

Chapter VI of the Act entrusts certain duties upon the employer ((Section 19)). Under which, every employer has to;

  1. Provide a safe working environment at workplace;
  2. Constitute an Internal Complaints Committee and conspicuously display the order constituting the Committee;
  3. Organize workshops and other training programmes at regular intervals for sensitizing employees;
  4. Provide assistance during any inquiry;
  5. Initiate actions against the perpetrator; and
  6. Provide assistance to the women if, she prefers to file complaint under the provisions of Indian Penal Code.

Redressal mechanisms – Complaint filing & Inquiry initiating

Chapter IV of the Act prescribes the procedures to be followed in filing complaint. Under the provisions of this Act, aggrieved women shall make a complaint in writing to the Internal Complaint Committee within three months of the last incident. In case the women is not in a position to file complaint due to her physical or mental incapacity, death or otherwise, her legal heir shall file the complaint ((Section 9)). In the absence of Internal Complaint Committee, complaint shall be filed with the Local Committee ((Id.)).

The Committee is required to complete the inquiry within a time period of three months. On completion of the inquiry, the report will be sent to the employer or the District Officer, as the case may be. They are mandated to take action on the report within two months. On request from the complainant, the committee shall provide for conciliation ((Section 10)). Complainant may also seek other remedies, including initiating criminal proceedings under the provisions of any other laws in existence.

Penalty & Appeal

The Committee shall recommend penalties for sexual harassment as per service rules applicable or the Rules under the Act, in case the allegations are proved. Besides, the Committee may provide for monetary compensation to the complainant. Further, whoever contravenes the provisions of Section 16 ((Prohibition of Publication or making known contents of complaint and inquiry proceedings)), shall be punished with a fine of Rs. 5000/- ((Section 17)). Any person aggrieved by the recommendations of the Committee, shall appeal within 90 days of the recommendations. All such appeal shall be preferred to a Court/Tribunal ((Section 18)).

Analysis & Major Issues

  1. Act insists upon the employer to constitute an Internal Complaints Committee at every unit. Practically, it may be impossible for big employers.
  2. Definition of employee is in its wider sense. Hence, it could be interpreted that, even a “domestic worker” who is working at home shall come under the protection of this Act.
  3. Each Internal Committee requires membership from an NGO or association committed to the cause of women. This implies that every unit in the country needs to have one such person in the Committee. There is no public data on the number of NGO personnel ‘committed to the cause of women’. There could be difficulties in implementation if sufficient number of such NGO personnel is not available ((PRS Legislative Brief, The Protection of Women against Sexual Harassment at Work Place Bill, 2010 available at http://www.prsindia.org/uploads/media/Sexual%20Harassment/Legislative%20Brief%20-%20Sexual%20Harassment%20-%2020May11.pdf last accessed on December 12, 2013.)).
  4. Act doesn’t provide the maximum number of members which shall form part of the Committee.
  5. The Internal Complaints Committee has been given powers of a civil court for summoning, discovery and production of documents etc. however, the composition of the Internal Committee does not require any member to have a legal background. Moreover, the Act does not specify any requirement of legal training to the Committee for fulfilling these duties. This provision differs from that of the Local Complaints Committee, in which at least one member has to ‘preferably’ have a background in law or legal knowledge ((Id.)).
  6. Act provides that every District Officer shall constitute a Local Complaints Committee in the district. However, jurisdiction and functions of these committees have not been detailed. It is also unclear whether the block or taluk level committees are permanent committees or temporary ad hoc committees constituted for dealing with specific cases only.
  7. Act provides that in case a committee is of the opinion that the allegation was false or malicious, it may recommend that action be taken against the woman who made the complaint. However, the provision also provides that mere inability to substantiate a complaint or provide adequate proof need not attract action against the complainant. Though there may be merit in providing safeguards against malicious complaints, this provision penalises every false complaints, which may not be malicious. This could deter women from filing complaints.

*** This article was initially published at eMagazine of ICSI Mysore Chapter (Edition 121, February 2014)